Welcome!

Silverlight Authors: Automic Blog, Michael Kopp, AppDynamics Blog, Kaazing Blog, Steven Mandel

Related Topics: Silverlight, Microsoft Cloud

Silverlight: Blog Feed Post

Upgrading to Windows 7 – Part Two

With the installation complete it was time to test the critical software I use daily

With the installation complete it was time to test the critical software I use daily. The first was Microsoft Outlook and as I expected it worked perfectly. So did the rest of the Office suite.

Next on my list were the Java environments that I use, Eclipse and NetBeans. First I checked at java.sun.com for newer versions of Java and found a new release 1.6 r15. I downloaded both the 32 bit and 64 bit versions. I uninstalled the version I currently had, 1.6 r13, and then installed the new versions. I installed the 32 bit version first followed by the 64 bit version. Going to a command window I executed “java –version” and got back:

Microsoft Windows [Version 6.1.7600]

Copyright (c) 2009 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\Users\neon>java -version

java version "1.6.0_15"

Java(TM) SE Runtime Environment (build 1.6.0_15-b03)

Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (build 14.1-b02, mixed mode)

 

 

First, I was happy to see that the Server VM was being used and not the Client VM. Then I was puzzled why the version of Windows was 6.1.7600 rather than 7. Steve Ballmer, could you please explain this?

Next I installed Eclipse 3.5 and Netbeans 6.7 and both ran flawlessly. These are both 32 bit applications which is why I knew to have 32 bit Java installed. Since there is no 64 bit Flash for Windows you can only use the 32 bit version of IE and so that is another reason for keeping the 32 bit Java around.

Now it was time to test my remote access to my desktop at school. Dawson uses SonicWall technology for remote access so it is necessary to execute a program called NetExtender. NetExtender refused to connect to the college. When I first switched to Vista at home there was a period of a few months while I waited for a Vista version of NetExtender. When I switched from 32 to 64 it was necessary to replace the 32 bit version with a 64 bit version. I decided the solution might be to uninstall NetExtender and re-install it. I did and it worked. Now Remote Desktop works flawlessly to my machine at school.

Next up was a media server called PS3. As its name implies it is designed to stream a wide range of media formats to a PlayStation 3. When I ran it, the PS3 in my living room could not be found. So I uninstalled it, reinstalled it, and the PS3 saw the PS3. However Windows 7 supports DivX, Xvid, and H.264 so I will likely rarely use the PS3 server. Instead I can use Windows 7 as my DLNA server for most of my needs.

An interesting feature I discovered was that when I told Windows Media Player where my music, photos, movies, and videos were on my computer they became available through Windows Explorer by their category. So when I select Pictures in Windows Explorer it shows me all the directories I told Media Player about. My PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 see these folders as well.

Now it was time to deal with the issue of anti-virus software since I could no longer use OneCare (can I get a refund Steve?). First I chose AVG because it was free. It installed without incident and the Action Center, the updated version of the Vista Security center, was happy to see it. The Action Center is a nice improvement as it is the single point of information about all issues such as security and updates.

There were two issues with AVG. The first was an annoyance; it would add a line of text to every email it scanned. I don’t want every email I send to be an advertisement for them. The second was the deal breaker. When downloading files with Windows Explorer the download would hang when it finished. When I closed the download box I immediately go a dialog asking if it could scan the file just downloaded. I suspect that the downloads were completed as the files were in their destination directory but this was too much of an annoyance. Out came AVG.

Next I selected Panda. Installation was smooth and it would not expire until the end of October. No annoying additions to emails and downloads worked flawlessly. The Action Center did whine, I mean give a warning that the format of the communication between itself and Panda was not up to the most recent set of rules for Win 7. But it seemed to work so I was happy.

I asked the technical staff at Dawson if they had a Windows 7 version of McAfee as the college licenses it for all its machines. They told me that the most recent Enterprise version, 8.7i, should work. So I uninstalled Panda and installed McAfee. No problems other than the same complaint from the Action Center about communicating with McAfee.

Then a strange problem cropped up. While streaming media from my Windows 7 computer to my PlayStation 3 the connection between the two would be dropped. Worse was the fact that when this happened the Windows 7 computer lost all access to my home network. I should mention that even before upgrading I was having network issues with the same computer. It would drop its connection randomly only to have it come back after I either rebooted my cable modem, my router, or the computer itself. I thought I was having router issues. The clue that this was not likely the router came from the fact that my Mac was fine with the network even when the Win 7 machine failed.

I ran “ipconfig /all” from a command prompt when the problem occurred and discovered that my computer believed that the media, the Ethernet cable, was disconnected. The light on the router and on the back of the computer said otherwise. The network interface on my P5K SE/EPU motherboard is based on an Atheros chipset. I searched for “Windows 7 atheros problem” and found my answer.

The Atheros interfaces on Asus motherboards occasionally fail to wake up when a computer goes to sleep and so behaves as if the media is disconnected. Not my problem as I don’t put my computer to sleep. Then I came across a number of messages from Windows 7 beta and RC users describing exactly the same problem I was having. No one knew why but there was general agreement on the solution. Turn off the chipset in the BIOS and install a network interface card.

I bought a D-Link DGE-530T for $29 and installed it. Since then the Win 7 computer has never lost its connection to my home network.

All the other software of mine that I have run since the upgrade has run flawlessly. My system used to take a little more than three minutes before I could run any software when started. With Windows 7 it is down to two minutes. Windows 7 will show you a desktop in under a minute but there are still processes being run in the background that forces you to wait another minute before the system is stable and responsive.

The upgrade of my school computer also went quite smoothly. That machine is an older Pentium D 3.4 GHz machine and was running Vista 32 bit. The upgrade to Windows 7 32 bit took a little over 3 hours whereas on my faster home computer it took an hour and a half. The only software that exhibited a problem was my Novell Client. I have come to the conclusion that software that uses the network interface for its work must be re-installed after an upgrade. I re-installed the Novell Client 2 for Vista/Windows 2008 and my connectivity to the college Novell based network was restored.

All in all I am quite pleased with Windows 7. There is still much to discover but what I have seen so far has pleased me. I like the new display of files found when searching in Windows Explorer. I like the Media Player categories working in Windows Explorer. The new task bar presents a new approach to managing multiple programs and multiple documents from a single program that actually improves work flow. The goofy Rolodex view is gone, too.

If you sat out Vista then it is time to junk that old clunker of an operating system called XP (sorry no cash for XP clunker deals). If you did adopt Vista then look at Windows 7 as Vista’s Service Pack 13 and upgrade. I wonder if anyone will line up at midnight on October 21st to get a retail copy of Windows 7?

More Stories By Ken Fogel

In 1980 I bought for myself the most wonderful toy of the day, the Apple ][+. Obsession followed quickly and by 1983 I was writing software for small and medium sized businesses in Montreal for both the Apple and the IBM PC under the company name Omnibus Systems. In the evenings I taught continuing education courses that demystified the computer to the first generation of workers who found themselves with their typewriter on the scrap heap and a PC with WordStar taking its place.

In 1990 I was invited to join the faculty at Dawson College in the Computer Science Technology program. When I joined the program the primary language was COBOL and my responsibility was to teach small systems languages such as BASIC and C/C++.

Today I am now the chairperson and program coordinator of the Computer Science Technology program at Dawson. The program's primary language is Java and the focus is on enterprise programming.

I like to write about the every day problems my students and I face in using various languages and platforms to get the job done. And from time to time I stray from the path and write about what I plan to do, what I actually get around to doing, and what I imagine I am doing.

@omniprof

IoT & Smart Cities Stories
While the focus and objectives of IoT initiatives are many and diverse, they all share a few common attributes, and one of those is the network. Commonly, that network includes the Internet, over which there isn't any real control for performance and availability. Or is there? The current state of the art for Big Data analytics, as applied to network telemetry, offers new opportunities for improving and assuring operational integrity. In his session at @ThingsExpo, Jim Frey, Vice President of S...
@CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX, two of the most influential technology events in the world, have hosted hundreds of sponsors and exhibitors since our launch 10 years ago. @CloudEXPO and @ExpoDX New York and Silicon Valley provide a full year of face-to-face marketing opportunities for your company. Each sponsorship and exhibit package comes with pre and post-show marketing programs. By sponsoring and exhibiting in New York and Silicon Valley, you reach a full complement of decision makers and buyers in ...
The Internet of Things is clearly many things: data collection and analytics, wearables, Smart Grids and Smart Cities, the Industrial Internet, and more. Cool platforms like Arduino, Raspberry Pi, Intel's Galileo and Edison, and a diverse world of sensors are making the IoT a great toy box for developers in all these areas. In this Power Panel at @ThingsExpo, moderated by Conference Chair Roger Strukhoff, panelists discussed what things are the most important, which will have the most profound e...
Two weeks ago (November 3-5), I attended the Cloud Expo Silicon Valley as a speaker, where I presented on the security and privacy due diligence requirements for cloud solutions. Cloud security is a topical issue for every CIO, CISO, and technology buyer. Decision-makers are always looking for insights on how to mitigate the security risks of implementing and using cloud solutions. Based on the presentation topics covered at the conference, as well as the general discussions heard between sessio...
The Jevons Paradox suggests that when technological advances increase efficiency of a resource, it results in an overall increase in consumption. Writing on the increased use of coal as a result of technological improvements, 19th-century economist William Stanley Jevons found that these improvements led to the development of new ways to utilize coal. In his session at 19th Cloud Expo, Mark Thiele, Chief Strategy Officer for Apcera, compared the Jevons Paradox to modern-day enterprise IT, examin...
Rodrigo Coutinho is part of OutSystems' founders' team and currently the Head of Product Design. He provides a cross-functional role where he supports Product Management in defining the positioning and direction of the Agile Platform, while at the same time promoting model-based development and new techniques to deliver applications in the cloud.
In his keynote at 18th Cloud Expo, Andrew Keys, Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise, provided an overview of the evolution of the Internet and the Database and the future of their combination – the Blockchain. Andrew Keys is Co-Founder of ConsenSys Enterprise. He comes to ConsenSys Enterprise with capital markets, technology and entrepreneurial experience. Previously, he worked for UBS investment bank in equities analysis. Later, he was responsible for the creation and distribution of life settl...
There are many examples of disruption in consumer space – Uber disrupting the cab industry, Airbnb disrupting the hospitality industry and so on; but have you wondered who is disrupting support and operations? AISERA helps make businesses and customers successful by offering consumer-like user experience for support and operations. We have built the world’s first AI-driven IT / HR / Cloud / Customer Support and Operations solution.
LogRocket helps product teams develop better experiences for users by recording videos of user sessions with logs and network data. It identifies UX problems and reveals the root cause of every bug. LogRocket presents impactful errors on a website, and how to reproduce it. With LogRocket, users can replay problems.
Data Theorem is a leading provider of modern application security. Its core mission is to analyze and secure any modern application anytime, anywhere. The Data Theorem Analyzer Engine continuously scans APIs and mobile applications in search of security flaws and data privacy gaps. Data Theorem products help organizations build safer applications that maximize data security and brand protection. The company has detected more than 300 million application eavesdropping incidents and currently secu...